*** empty log message ***
[mmondor.git] / mmsoftware / mmmail / etc / mmsmtpd.conf
1 ; $Id: mmsmtpd.conf,v 1.5 2004/09/27 21:24:12 mmondor Exp $
2 ;
3 ; mmsmtpd configuration file (/etc/mmsmtpd.conf)
4 ; and # are considered comments, and can happen at start or end of line.
5 ; Read the mmsmtpd.conf(5) man page for details.
6
7
8 ; Daemon administration options
9 ; -----------------------------
10 ;
11 ; Number of asynchroneous slave processes that should be launched and used
12 ; to perform tasks such as hostname resolving.
13 ASYNC_PROCESSES 3
14 ;
15 ; Optional location of directory we should chroot(2) to. Note that special
16 ; configuration is requried for this, /etc/hosts and /etc/resolv.conf
17 ; files will be required in the new root for instance.
18 ;CHROOT_DIR ""
19 ;
20 ; Location of the path where to store our process ID
21 PID_PATH        "/var/run/mmsmtpd.pid"
22 ;
23 ; If using MMMAIL_FILE for file storage of message bodies rather than
24 ; MMMAIL_MYSQL, this specifies where mail box directories should be created
25 ; and messages stored in them. This should also work fine using NFS.
26 ;
27 MAIL_DIR        "/var/mmmail-dir"
28 ;
29 ; User mmsmtpd should run as
30 USER            "mmmail"
31 ; Groups process should be part of
32 GROUPS          mmmail,mmstat
33 ;
34 ; Increase this to higher values if high server load is expected
35 ALLOC_BUFFERS   1
36 ;
37 ; Logging verbosity level for syslog
38 ;       0 = critical and important messages only
39 ;       1 = connections are logged
40 ;       2 = informational logging (HELO, MAIL and RCPT are logged)
41 ;       3 = verbose logging (all commands and replies)
42 ;       4 = debugging (even message DATA lines are logged)
43 LOG_FACILITY    LOG_AUTHPRIV            LOG_LEVEL       2
44
45
46 ; TCP service general and security options
47 ; ----------------------------------------
48 ;
49 ; IP addresses we should bind() to, separated by spaces
50 LISTEN_IPS      "127.0.0.1"
51 ;
52 ; Advertized server hostnames, separated by spaces, there should be the same
53 ; number of entries than for LISTEN_IPS
54 SERVER_NAMES    "smtp.localhost"
55 ;
56 ; Port we listen for connections on
57 LISTEN_PORT     25
58 ;
59 ; Resolving hostnames for logging can make the system slow depending on
60 ; DNS server reliability and service load
61 RESOLVE_HOSTS   FALSE
62 ;
63 ; If TRUE, will force a delay when the client performs an error.
64 DELAY_ON_ERROR  FALSE
65 ;
66 ; Maximum number of bad commands user may issue per session
67 MAX_ERRORS      16
68 ;
69 ; Total maximum number of simultanious different IP addresses we allow
70 MAX_IPS         64
71 ; Maximum simultanious connections per single IP address we accept
72 MAX_PER_IP      1
73 ;
74 ; Maximum number of connections per IP address to accept within 
75 ; CONNECTION_PERIOD seconds (0 to disable connection rate limit)
76 CONNECTION_RATE 10
77 ; Period in seconds in which a maximum of CONNECTION_RATE connections are
78 ; allowed
79 CONNECTION_PERIOD 30
80 ;
81 ; Inactivity input timeout in seconds
82 INPUT_TIMEOUT   900
83 ;
84 ; Maximum bandwidth allowed per connection, specified in kilobytes/second.
85 ; 0 will disable bandwidth shaping. IN is how fast we accept data from the
86 ; client, and OUT for how fast we may send data to the client. This is on
87 ; a connection basis, which means that MAXIPS and MAXPERIP should be taken
88 ; in consideration if bandwidth is to be controlled for all traffic (eg: to
89 ; limit the daemon's total bandwidth limit to 380k/sec for instance)
90 BANDWIDTH_IN    16                      BANDWIDTH_OUT   4
91 ;
92 ; The global maximum bandwidth speed limit, in kilobytes per second, for the
93 ; whole server, at which it is allowed to read and write from/to clients.
94 ; 0 for no limit.
95 GBANDWIDTH_IN   0                       GBANDWIDTH_OUT  0
96
97
98 ; SMTP security options
99 ; ---------------------
100 ;
101 ; Should statistics be kept using the mmstat(3) facility about hosts issueing
102 ; wrong destination addresses? Then how about hosts that flood with messages?
103 STATFAIL_ADDRESS TRUE
104 STATFAIL_FLOOD  TRUE
105 ;
106 ; Should statistics also be kept on the number of times a mailbox was full
107 ; when an attempt to insert a new message was made?
108 STATFAIL_FULL   TRUE
109 ;
110 ; Statistics about addresses timeing out while sending a message
111 STATFAIL_TIMEOUT TRUE
112 ;
113 ; Should we only accept MAIL command from valid addresses with MX records?
114 RESOLVE_MX_MAIL FALSE
115 ;
116 ; Is client required to HELO before being allowed to use MAIL?
117 REQUIRE_HELO    FALSE
118 ;
119 ; Maximum number of allowed destination recipients per message
120 MAX_RCPTS       16
121 ;
122 ; Maximum DATA lines to accept for a message, make sure that it is enough for
123 ; general messages of MAX_DATA_SIZE bytes large.
124 MAX_DATA_LINES  16000
125 ;
126 ; Maximum allowed DATA message size in bytes. Note that MySQL must also have
127 ; been setup to accept BLOB fields of MAX_DATA_SIZE, via the
128 ; max_allowed_packet and optionally query_buffer_size MySQL control variables.
129 ; This can be as simple as passing -O max_allowed_packet=10M as command-line
130 ; argument to mysqld.
131 MAX_DATA_SIZE   1048576
132 ;
133 ; Maximum number of Received: lines allowed in a message
134 MAX_HOPS        30
135 ;
136 ; For use against mail bombing, these optionally can be set.
137 ; Turns on or off mail flood protection. These are on a per-client
138 ; address/hostname basis.
139 FLOOD_PROTECTION TRUE
140 ;
141 ; The following only are taken into account if FLOOD_PROTECTION is TRUE.
142 ; Make sure that this is high enough, depending on how you set FLOOD_EXPIRES
143 ; and FLOOD_MESSAGES. It specifies the maximum number of cache entries which
144 ; can be remembered for hosts from which mail was recently received.
145 ; This typically can be set to the same value as MAX_IPS, or larger.
146 FLOOD_CACHE     100
147 ;
148 ; This specifies how many messages maximum will be accepted within
149 ; FLOOD_EXPIRES delay. Higher than this will be considered flood, and a
150 ; try again reply will be sent to the SMTP client.
151 FLOOD_MESSAGES  20
152 ;
153 ; This is the number of minutes for which the cache entry for a host will
154 ; be remembered. It thus consists of the number of minutes within which a
155 ; maximum of FLOOD_MESSAGES will be accepted, on a per-host basis.
156 FLOOD_EXPIRES   30
157
158
159 ; MySQL options
160 ; -------------
161 ;
162 ; Host name of MySQL server we should connect to (localhost for UNIX socket)
163 DB_HOST         "localhost"
164 ;
165 ; MySQL user which has all access on DB_DATABASE
166 DB_USER         "mmmail"
167 ;
168 ; MySQL authentication password for DB_USER
169 DB_PASSWORD     "mmmailpassword"
170 ;
171 ; Name of mmmail MySQL database DB_USER owns, typically "mmmail"
172 DB_DATABASE     "mmmail"